Atri

Feb 182020
 

Arlington, VA – The American Transportation Research Institute today released its annual list highlighting the most congested bottlenecks for trucks in America.

The 2020 Top Truck Bottleneck List assesses the level of truck-involved congestion at 300 locations on the national highway system.  The analysis, based on truck GPS data from over 1 million heavy duty trucks uses several customized software applications and analysis methods, along with terabytes of data from trucking operations to produce a congestion impact ranking for each location.  ATRI’s truck GPS data is also used to support the U.S. DOT’s Freight Mobility Initiative.  The bottleneck locations detailed in this latest ATRI list represent the top 100 congested locations, although ATRI continuously monitors more than 300 freight-critical locations.

The intersection of I-95 and SR 4 in Fort Lee, New Jersey is once again the Number One freight bottleneck in the country.  The rest of the Top 10 includes:

  1. Atlanta: I-285 at I-85 (North)
  2. Nashville: I-24/I-40 at I-440 (East)
  3. Houston: I-45 at I-69/US 59
  4. Atlanta, GA: I-75 at I-285 (North)
  5. Chicago, IL: I-290 at I-90/I-94
  6. Atlanta, GA: I-20 at I-285 (West)
  7. Cincinnati, OH: I-71 at I-75
  8. Los Angeles, CA: SR 60 at SR 57
  9. Los Angeles, CA: I-710 at I-105

“ATRI’s bottleneck analysis is an important tool for TDOT as we work to maximize the safety and efficiency of our transportation system, and ensure we are making the smartest investments possible,” said Tennessee Department of Transportation Assistant Bureau Chief Freight & Logistics Dan Pallme.  “The additional capacity we are providing as part of the ongoing I-440 Reconstruction Project should improve the safety and reliability of this important corridor, which we know is critical to freight movement.”

ATRI’s analysis, which utilized data from 2019, found that the number of locations experiencing significant congestion – with average daily speeds of 45 MPH or less – has increased 92 percent in just five years, far outpacing the 10 percent growth in traffic congestion for that same time period.

“ATA has been beating the drum about the continued degradation of our infrastructure, and thanks to ATRI’s research we can see exactly how decades of ignoring the problem are impacting not just our industry but our economy and commuters everywhere,” said American Trucking Associations President and CEO Chris Spear. “This report should sound the alarm for policymakers that the cost of doing nothing is too high, and provide a roadmap of where to target investments to really solve our nation’s mounting infrastructure crisis.”

For access to the full report, including detailed information on each of the 100 top congested locations, please click here.

ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501c3 not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system.

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Feb 182020
 

Since 2002, the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) has collected and processed truck GPS data in support of numerous U.S. DOT freight mobility initiatives. Using truck GPS data from over 1 million trucks, ATRI develops and monitors a series of key performance measures on the nation’s freight transportation system. Among many GPS analyses, ATRI now converts its truck GPS dataset into an ongoing analysis that is used to quantify the impact of traffic congestion on truck-borne freight at 300 specific locations.

Measuring the performance of freight movement across our nation’s highways is critical to understanding where and at what level investment should be made. The information provided through this effort empowers decision-making in both the private and public sectors by helping stakeholders better understand the severity of congestion and mobility constraints on the U.S. highway transportation system. This is of particular importance as the nation weighs the needs and resources available for transportation funding.

On a state and local level, this research can inform local investment decisions that can directly improve supply chain efficiency. ATRI’s bottleneck analysis incorporates and synthesizes several unique components, including a massive database of truck GPS data at freight-significant locations throughout the U.S., and an algorithm that quantifies the impact of congestion on truck-based freight. In addition, the annual reports provide a chronological repository of mobility profiles, allowing congestion changes to be assessed over time. This allows transportation analysts and planners to conduct performance benchmarking and identification of influential factors contributing to congestion and the requisite consequences on freight mobility.

  • For the bottleneck brochure with a list of all 100 locations, click here.
  • For a description of the research methodology, click here.
  • The top 100 congestion profiles are listed in rank-order by congestion level in the table below.  You may view a location by clicking a location hyperlink.  You may also sort any column by clicking header in that column.

Congestion
Ranking
Location DescriptionStateAverage
Speed
Peak
Average
Speed
Non-Peak
Average
Speed
Speed
Percent Change
Y-o-Y
1Fort Lee, NJ: I-95 at SR 4NJ29.722.432.45.1%
2Atlanta, GA: I-285 at I-85 (North)GA34.022.440.2-0.6%
3Nashville, TN: I-24/I-40 at I-440 (East)TN36.324.042.5-12.0%
4Houston, TX: I-45 at I-69/US 59TX30.920.536.1-8.6%
5Atlanta, GA: I-75 at I-285 (North)GA40.529.246.45.0%
6Chicago, IL: I-290 at I-90/I-94IL21.716.123.8-2.6%
7Atlanta, GA: I-20 at I-285 (West)GA42.636.445.2-0.8%
8Cincinnati, OH: I-71 at I-75OH43.936.047.0-5.1%
9Los Angeles, CA: SR 60 at SR 57CA40.233.143.3-1.9%
10Los Angeles, CA: I-710 at I-105CA35.425.240.9-4.1%
11Hartford, CT: I-84 at I-91CT42.732.846.5-2.1%
12San Bernardino, CA: I-10 at I-15CA41.932.546.0-2.9%
13Rye, NY: I-95 at I-287NY42.940.843.4-11.7%
14Houston, TX: I-10 at I-45TX37.924.945.4-4.5%
15Denver, CO: I-70 Central ProjectCO36.028.339.8-10.4%
16Austin, TX: I-35TX27.415.732.3-8.7%
17Houston, TX: I-45 at I-610 (North)TX38.726.146.0-12.9%
18Dallas, TX: I-45 at I-30TX38.527.843.4-2.8%
19Portland, OR: I-5 at I-84OR30.723.034.8-6.7%
20Indianapolis, IN: I-65 at I-70 (North)IN45.034.550.5-8.5%
21Denver, CO: I-70 at I-25CO38.129.742.4-3.4%
22Nashville, TN: I-40 at I-65 (East)TN37.226.441.9-7.8%
23Houston, TX: I-10 at I-610 (West)TX43.631.249.8-2.1%
24Atlanta, GA: I-20 at I-285 (East)GA45.038.347.9-1.2%
25Greenville, SC: I-85 at I-385SC45.937.949.6-11.5%
26Chicago, IL: I-90 at I-94 (North)IL29.016.636.14.1%
27Baton Rouge, LA: I-10 at I-110LA37.429.441.50.02%
28Chicago, IL: I-90 at I-94 (South)IL40.531.844.0-3.1%
29Queens, NY: I-495NY24.115.029.66.0%
30Phoenix, AZ: I-17 at I-10AZ42.829.649.3-2.0%
31Brooklyn, NY: I-278 at Belt ParkwayNY35.025.439.1-3.0%
32Chattanooga, TN: I-75 at I-24TN50.547.751.6-5.9%
33St. Louis, MO: I-64/I-55 at I-44MO45.441.846.810.7%
34Vancouver, WA: I-5 at Columbia RiverWA41.635.444.1-2.5%
35Tacoma, WA: I-5 at I-705/SR 16WA39.131.742.7-11.4%
36Oakland, CA: I-880 at I-238CA39.632.143.5-1.7%
37Stamford, CT: I-95CT39.831.442.2-0.5%
38Providence, RI: I-95 at I-195RI39.631.743.3-3.9%
39Federal Way, WA: SR 18 at I-5WA42.132.946.9-9.1%
40Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN: I-35W at I-494MN43.233.748.2-1.3%
41Corona, CA: I-15 at SR 91CA42.033.844.9-7.9%
42Indianapolis, IN: I-65 at I-70 (South)IN44.334.949.2-5.9%
43Dallas, TX: US 75 at I-635TX43.832.648.9-5.8%
44Seattle, WA: I-5 at I-90WA32.725.636.35.2%
45Philadelphia, PA: I-76 at I-676PA29.023.331.1-3.2%
46Chicago, IL: I-80 at I-94IL51.147.252.7-6.8%
47Gary, IN: I-65 at I-80IN50.348.650.9-7.3%
48Atlanta, GA: I-20 at I-75/I-85GA37.326.941.8-3.1%
49Norwalk, CT: I-95CT42.830.447.3-3.1%
50Baltimore, MD: I-695 at I-70MD44.034.248.5-0.7%
51Chattanooga, TN: I-24 at US 27TN47.038.051.71.7%
52Philadelphia, PA: I-76 at US 1PA31.021.935.51.0%
53Houston, TX: I-610 at US 290TX42.430.649.14.4%
54Kansas City, MO: I-70 at I-670 at US 71MO45.938.549.10.0%
55Houston, TX: I-10 at I-610 (East )TX49.042.052.11.0%
56Charlotte, NC: I-85 at I-485 (West)NC49.540.554.1-11.1%
57Charlotte, NC: I-77 at I-485 (South)NC50.641.854.7-0.4%
58Bronx, NY: I-678NY31.625.834.42.3%
59Detroit, MI: I-94 at I-75MI44.738.247.822.9%
60Auburn, WA: SR 18 at SR 167WA43.735.747.4-6.0%
61Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN: I-35E at I-94MN42.333.247.0-8.3%
62McDonough, GA: I-75GA51.649.352.4-2.7%
63Los Angeles, CA: I-110 at I-105CA37.928.542.32.0%
64Boston, MA: I-95 at I-90MA43.032.147.8-5.3%
65Philadelphia, PA: I-476 at I-95PA42.733.147.3-2.7%
66Milwaukee, WI: I-94/I-794 at I-43WI42.432.448.11.5%
67Cincinnati, OH: I-75 at I-74OH46.938.150.6-4.4%
68Denver, CO: I-25 at I-76CO46.437.450.8-5.6%
69Phoenix, AZ: I-10 at US 60AZ47.737.852.1-3.3%
70Piscataway, NJ: I-287NJ45.533.851.4-3.7%
71Atlanta, GA: I-75 at I-85GA34.923.540.20.01%
72Washington, DC: I-95 at I-495 (North)DC45.633.050.6-5.2%
73Houston, TX: I-610 at I-69/US 59 (West)TX37.928.642.0-13.8%
74Nashville, TN: I-65 at I-24TN47.936.853.0-5.2%
75Oakland, CA: I-80 at I-580/I-880CA31.623.735.55.4%
76Seattle, WA: I-90 at I-405WA36.628.640.41.0%
77Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN: I-35W at I-694MN45.235.950.5-9.5%
78Pittsburgh, PA: I-70 at I-79 (East)PA47.546.747.9-2.3%
79Elmsford, NY: I-287 at I-87NY47.035.851.43.5%
80Baltimore, MD: I-95 at I-395MD43.533.748.0-8.8%
81Nyack, NY: I-287NY46.535.650.70.1%
82Philadelphia, PA: I-76 at I-476PA44.635.448.7-0.1%
83Manhasset, NY: I-495 at Shelter Rock RoadNY41.832.445.91.2%
84Boston, MA: I-95 at I-93 (North)MA41.731.846.4-3.9%
85Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN: I-94 at US 52MN34.227.438.0-4.5%
86Boston, MA: I-93 at SR 3MA36.124.543.4-4.0%
87Cincinnati, OH: I-75/I-71 at I-275OH50.143.153.3-4.4%
88Portland, OR: I-5 at I-205 (South)OR45.736.051.1-6.5%
89Baltimore, MD: I-695 at I-83MD47.237.751.0-4.2%
90Ft. Worth, TX: I-35W at I-30TX45.836.450.12.1%
91Tampa, FL: I-4 at I-275FL39.228.044.8-4.9%
92Charleston, SC: I-26 at I-526SC43.833.949.0-2.4%
93Indianapolis, IN: I-465 at I-69IN49.641.753.20.7%
94Nashville, TN: I-65 at I-440TN43.030.149.9-16.0%
95Minneapolis - St. Paul, MN: I-35W at I-94MN37.930.441.8-1.4%
96Charlotte, NC: I-77 near Lake NormanNC43.533.848.721.8%
97Columbus, OH: I-71 at I-70OH44.237.346.8-0.8%
98Harrisburg, PA: SR 581 at I-83PA48.241.950.9-3.2%
99Washington, DC: I-495 at I-66DC43.133.046.4-7.1%
100Baltimore, MD: I-95 at I-695 (South)MD49.039.353.3-4.9%

Jan 292020
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Daniel Murray
(651) 641-6162
January 29, 2020

 

Arlington, Virginia – The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) today released new research that documents the collection and distribution of $14.7 billion in U.S. toll revenue, representing 82 percent of U.S. toll collections. The research sheds light on many questions about tolling, including how much toll revenue is generated versus reinvested in toll facilities, and contrasts truck-generated toll revenue versus truck utilization of toll roads.

This study was identified as the top research priority for the industry by ATRI’s Research Advisory Committee in 2019.

To better understand tolling, researchers collected public financial data from Comprehensive Annual Financial Reports (CAFR) published by toll systems, and attempted to standardize financial comparisons across systems. Key metrics included toll facility charges by user type, toll facility expenditures and toll revenue diversion to non-toll entities.

ATRI’s research found that the 21 major toll systems analyzed collected more than $14.7 billion in revenue with nearly 50 percent of toll revenue diverted to other uses. In addition, toll revenue increased more than 72 percent over the last decade compared to inflation growth of just 16.9 percent.

The report includes a first-of-its-kind data analysis to better understand the relationship between interstate commerce and toll road utilization. Through an analysis of truck GPS data, the researchers were able to quantify toll revenue impacts on local truck activity versus interstate commerce.

“It is clear from this research that highway funding mechanisms that return our tax investments to highways are far superior to tolling,” said Darren Hawkins, YRC Worldwide Chief Executive Officer. “We need greater oversight and transparency to ensure that the billions of dollars paid by our industry goes back into the roads and bridges that generate the revenue.”

You can download the full report and Executive Summary of Key Findings – A Financial Analysis of Toll System Revenue: Who Pays & Who Benefitsby clicking here.

ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501c3 not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system.

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Jan 292020
 

For a free copy of the full report or executive summary of key findings electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted, you will be directed to a page where you may download the report and/or one-pager. Please note the files are large so it may take a few minutes once you click the links:

Please indicate if you are a: *

 

Jan 132020
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Daniel Murray
(651) 641-6162
January 13, 2020

Arlington, Virginia – The American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI) today released new research that identifies both the positive and negative impacts associated with numerous government policies, programs and regulations that target autonomous truck development and testing. ATRI’s study proposes a framework by which autonomous truck standards could be developed.

This study was identified as the top research priority for the industry by ATRI’s Research Advisory Committee in 2018.

More specifically, the report documents the dozens of local, state and federal activities that guide and regulate autonomous truck activities. While most attempt to create a framework for the safe testing of autonomous trucks, the myriad state and local activities ultimately impede the creation of a seamless and standardized autonomous truck (AT) network. Even those government rules that ostensibly support autonomous truck development often are too prescriptive to generate meaningful outcomes. For example, multiple vendors highlight Level 4 testing, even though regulations require constant control of the vehicles by both drivers and onboard engineers – making it difficult for motor carrier executives to accurately assess the real value of ATs.

“The pace of technology development in the autonomous truck sphere is moving at lightning speed,” said Jeff Reed, Skyline Transportation President and chair of the ATA Automated Truck Subcommittee. “Our industry needs states to collaborate on seamless policies and regulations, and we need more proactive federal guidance on AT development. Government activities at all levels must be dynamic enough to address the constantly evolving technology landscape.”

You can download the report – Redefining the Role of Government Activities in Automated Trucking – by clicking here.

ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501c3 not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system.

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Jan 132020
 

For a free copy of this report electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted, the report will begin downloading automatically. Please note the file is large so it may take a few minutes to download:

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Nov 042019
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Daniel Murray
(651) 641-6162
November 4, 2019

Arlington, Virginia – The American Transportation Research Institute today released the findings of its 2019 update to “An Analysis of the Operational Costs of Trucking.” Using detailed financial data provided directly by motor carriers of all sectors and fleet sizes, this “Ops Costs” research annually documents and analyzes trucking costs from 2008 through 2018. ATRI’s analysis provides industry stakeholders with an essential benchmarking tool, and government agencies with input on industry finances necessary for comprehensive transportation planning and infrastructure improvement analyses.

ATRI’s newest 2019 Ops Costs report documents the extremely robust economic environment that carriers and drivers experienced in 2018, but these same economic conditions put considerable upward pressure on nearly every line-item cost center experienced by carriers.

The average marginal cost per mile incurred by motor carriers in 2018 increased 7.7 percent to $1.82. Costs rose in every cost center except tires, with fuel costs experiencing the highest year-over-year growth of 17.7 percent. Not surprisingly, insurance costs saw the second fastest year-over-year growth at 12 percent. As a strategic response to the severe driver shortage that existed in 2018, driver wages and benefits increased 7.0 and 4.7 percent, respectively – representing 43 percent of all marginal costs in 2018.

Repair & maintenance (R&M) costs, at 17.1 cents per mile in 2018, have increased 24 percent since 2012 – a counterintuitive increase given the record sales of new trucks and trailers. From 2012 to 2018, overall motor carrier operational costs have increased more than 11.6 percent – exceeding the 10.8 percent inflation rate for that same time period.

ATRI’s 2019 report again includes an “Industry Sector in Focus” analysis for tank fleet operators.

“ATRI’s 2019 Operational Costs research highlights the extent of the cost increases our industry experienced in 2018. Savvy carriers will continue to use this cost data as a benchmarking tool, and to better educate our customers on the financial and operating pressures our industry faces,” said Jerry Sigmon, Executive Vice President of Cargo Transporters, Inc. “The new 2019 report also gives us important explanations and hints on how to better manage the cost volatility we’ve been experiencing.”

Since its original publication in 2008, ATRI has received over 16,000 requests for the Operational Costs reports.

A copy of this report is available here.

ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501c3 not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system.

# # #

Nov 042019
 

For a free copy of this report electronically, please provide the information below. Once your information has been submitted, the report will begin downloading automatically. Please note the file is large so it may take a few minutes to download:

Please indicate if you are a: *

 

Oct 232019
 

Heavy and Tractor-Trailer Truck Driver Employment and Wages by State (PDF)
2019 Annual State and Federal Highway User Taxes and Fees (PDF)
State Car and Truck Speed Limits (pdf)
State Sales and Property Tax on Rolling Stock (pdf)

Compendium of State Fines for Weight Violations

 

Oct 102019
 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Contact: Rebecca Brewster
(770) 432-0628
October 10, 2019

 

Hugh Ekberg, President and CEO of CRST Internationa, Inc.

 

Arlington, Virginia – CRST International President and Chief Executive Officer Hugh Ekberg has been appointed to the Board of Directors of the American Transportation Research Institute (ATRI).

Ekberg was appointed President and CEO of CRST International in October 2018. He joined CRST in 2016 as Group President/Chief Operating Officer of CRST’s western region of operating companies. Prior to CRST, he served as President – Kitchen & Bath Americas for Kohler Company. Ekberg has also served as Division President and a Board Member at Weitz Company and with Hirsh Industries in various progressive roles, including EVP of Operations, COO and President.

Ekberg holds a Master of Science degree in engineering management from Northwestern University’s McCormick School of Engineering and an MBA in marketing and organizational design from the J.L. Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. He earned his bachelor’s degree in mechanical engineering from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT).

Ekberg was appointed to the ATRI Board of Directors by ATRI Board Chair Judy McReynolds, chairman, president and CEO of ArcBest Corporation.

A complete listing of the ATRI Board of Directors is available here.

ATRI is the trucking industry’s 501c3 not-for-profit research organization. It is engaged in critical research relating to freight transportation’s essential role in maintaining a safe, secure and efficient transportation system.

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